Take Control of Google Sheets in your Classroom

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Google Sheets is a powerful tool in today’s classroom for teachers and students alike.  Knowing how to use all of its features helps make work easier and faster. Many features also leave your shared documents more secure.  Here are 8 Google Sheets tips for teachers to make keep your classroom running smoothly.

1.  Lines Breaks

Hitting Ctrl+Enter will break the text in a cell into 2 lines, making your text easier to understand.

2.  Merging Cells

Combining cells is another simple, yet powerful tool in Google Sheets.  Just highlight the cells you want combined, go to Format on the toolbar, and Merge Cells.

3.  Text Wrap

If you want to wrap the text in a cell instead of letting it overflow, select the cell, click Format, Text Wrapping, and then select Wrap.

4.  Freezing Columns and Rows

You can see the data in certain columns or rows even while you scroll by freezing them.  Simply hit view in the Toolbar, click Freeze, then pick how many rows or columns you’re freezing.

5.  Charts

To help students or administrators better understand your data, you can quickly make a chart by highlighting all of the data you want to include in the chart, click on the Insert tab, and hit Chart.  That opens the Chart editor where you can fully customize your chart.

6.  Formulas

Similarly to Microsoft Excel, Google Sheets allows you to use formulas to calculate and sort data in your spreadsheet.  Here is Woorkup’s top 10 list of Google Sheet Formulas.

7.  Sheet and Range Protection

Sharing your spreadsheet with others, especially students, risks having unwanted edits made to the document.  You can protect a sheet or range by going to the Data tab and clicking Protected Sheets and Ranges. You can tell Sheets exactly what you want to protect with the Protected Sheets Editor.

8.  Take your sheets anywhere

With the Google Sheets app, you can access documents from anywhere and even download certain spreadsheets so that you can edit them offline on your mobile device.

Story via The Edvocate

Ingrid Schmidt